Reciprocal Health Care Agreement Post Brexit

Reciprocal health care agreement post-Brexit: What you need to know

With the United Kingdom having officially left the European Union on January 31, 2020, a lot of changes are anticipated in various aspects of both EU and UK policies. One of the crucial areas of concern is healthcare, particularly regarding the reciprocal health care agreement.

For years, UK citizens have been able to access medical care when travelling or living in EU nations through a reciprocal health care agreement. The agreement, otherwise known as EHIC (European Health Insurance Card), permits UK residents to seek necessary medical care at the same cost as the locals of that particular EU country.

However, following Brexit, this reciprocal health care agreement is no longer guaranteed. UK citizens are advised to obtain valid travel insurance that covers medical expenses when travelling to EU nations. The same applies to EU citizens who travel or reside in the United Kingdom.

The UK and EU have been in negotiations over a new health care agreement since the referendum. The details of this agreement remain uncertain, although it is expected to include provisions for reciprocal health care between UK citizens and EU citizens. The new agreement will likely be similar to the previous EHIC agreement, but with some changes due to Brexit.

So, what do UK citizens travelling to the EU need to know about the current situation? Firstly, ensure you have adequate travel insurance that covers medical expenses when travelling to EU countries. Also, be prepared to pay for medical services upfront and then claim the cost back from your insurer.

If you are a resident in an EU nation, you may continue to use the UK`s National Health Service (NHS) when visiting the United Kingdom. However, UK citizens may not have access to healthcare services in an EU nation without a valid travel insurance policy.

The UK government has also confirmed that they will continue to fund healthcare for UK residents living and working in EU nations until the end of December 2020. After that, the future of the reciprocal health care agreement will depend on the UK and EU`s negotiations.

In summary, the reciprocal health care agreement post-Brexit is uncertain. UK citizens travelling to the EU and EU citizens travelling to the United Kingdom are advised to have adequate travel insurance that covers medical expenses. The ongoing UK and EU negotiations over a new health care agreement will determine the future of reciprocal health care between UK and EU citizens, with details expected to be released in the coming months.

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